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20121228
20121228
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the task 12 months. >> in europe, it was all about the debt crisis. greece and spain were the worst hit. >> eventually, it was the european central bank's controversial bond-buying program that manage to come down the markets -- calm down the markets. >> germany's finance minister says he thinks the worst is behind us. is he right? >> the wildfires in 2012 were the worst spain had experienced in years, but it was not the only disaster the country had to deal with. the financial sector was also in flames. right from the beginning of the year, it was clear that the eurozone had a tough time ahead. credit rating agencies handed out significant downgrades to spain and portugal in particular. europe's firefighting coalition of finance ministers hoped a fiscal pact with tight budgetary controls and national debt breaks would need future crises in the bud, but some economists were more realistic. >> the fiscal pact was basically superfluous. we already knew that all the countries were trying to cut back. weather or not they continue making cuts in 2018, which is what the fiscal pact promise, i
. most associations expect employee numbers to remain stable. >> it is a very different picture in spain where unemployment there remains at record highs. 25% of spanish workers remain out of a job, and with government spending being cut, that number is expected to increase. >> there has been a wave of protests throughout 2012. today, health workers hit streets in the capital, madrid. >> public health workers took their complaints to the door of the health ministry. >> the first thing we are going to notice is the decrease in the quality of care. other consequences will be a higher mortality rate. people will also stay sick longer. >> the prime minister's government is making cuts in many areas. that includes reduced unemployment benefits and cuts for civil servants. add to that a hike in the value- added tax. the combined savings are supposed to bring down spain's budget deficit. the eu is giving madrid more time to get its deficits in line. reductions in health spending are only part of the total to save, but the symbolic value of cutting medical care is great, and so is public anger.
from spain, some of them with the spanish royal armies; other irish influx arrived from the u.s. for the construction of railroads used to transport sugar cane to the sugar plantations. that was at the end of the 19th century. and then at the beginning of the 20th century, we're talking 1902, 1910, before odono that i mentioned before, this man who gave his name to -- he was very proud of this lighthouse. the cubans offer hospitality to general alexander alejandro o'reilly. he rose through the ranks of the spanish army. the spanish sent alexander o'reilly to cuba to form a militia. he was appointed governor of louisiana and head of the army later on. he arrived in august, 1769, and took formal possession of louisiana for spain. think of new orleans and cuba, in particular havana, governors there were also in cuba so there was all this traveling from one city to another because later when i got my ph.d. from tulaine university and i went to the irish channel. it's interesting, the irish history connected with new orleans. so the o'reilly family has been in louisiana for centuri
is a spanish instrument and the lyrics are from spain and the type of song is indigenous and the type of percussion can is african. >> (inaudible). >> yeah, you could hear in the music. it has that pitch and that sadness to it. >> (inaudible). >> okay. so can you play the first song? we will show you a little bit and then you guys can come up and dance. (music). (applause). (music) >> you're watching quick bite, the show that has san francisco. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> we're here at one of the many food centric districts of san francisco, the 18th street corridor which locals have affectionately dubbed the castro. a cross between castro and gastronomic. the bakery, pizza, and dolores park cafe, there is no end in sight for the mouth watering food options here. adding to the culinary delights is the family of business he which includes skylight creamery, skylight and the 18 raisin. >> skylight market has been here since 1940. it's been in the family since 1964. his father and uncle bought the market and ran it through sam taking it over in 1998. at that point sam revamped the market. he instal
. and, of course, it is recognized. >> what's your view on spain? the country managed to avoid bailout so far, but will not meet its deficit target for the full year. do you think spain should be given more time? >> well, first of all, i think that, again, spain is going in the right direction. when you look at the current account, the deficit, you see that it had been diminished massively since the peak that they had in 2008, 2009. and, you know, as a very short summing up, it's been divided by more than five, though it's very, very encouraging. on the other hand, you have unit labor costs which have been diminishing quite a lot and the exports of spain are very dynamic today. so it also demonstrates that hard work is being done. it's difficult. it's tough, but going in the right direction. i trust that the global observers are observing progressively and the adjustment is proceed. in spain and in all the countries that are under adjustment. >> now, lonmin's ceo ian farmer is stepping down while being treated for a serious illness after being first admitted to hospital back in august.
't want anybody in spain but the spanish. is that scary? they're communists, yes, but they want total disarmament now. is that scary? hitler and mussolini are using the spanish earth as testing ground for what they want. another world war. is that scary? you're darn right it is! >> barbra streisand in "the way we were." that's my single favorite movie of all time. >> really? >> i told robert redford about it. he said he'd been resisting your clarion call for a sequel ever since. >> it's such a good story for a sequel. >> he's never made a sequel to anything, he told me. he just doesn't believe -- >> i understand that. but this happens to be a great story. i wanted it to be released on the 25th anniversary, but we never made it. >> what would have happened? >> it just was a very interesting story about through their daughter and her political activism at berkeley in 1968 and the democratic national convention, which is very interesting. it was a beautiful love story again. >> now, i know that you're into your politics big time because we spent most of the last month e-mailing each othe
and reaching as far west as spain. to the east, it encompassed egypt, turkey, greece, and palestine, where jesus was born in the jewish land of judea, then ruled by king herod. >> in judea, the king, herod, was in effect a client king. he ruled almost in place of rome. he was the... he was the voice of rome, the instrument of rome, probably "instrument of rome" is best in that, because he... he had his own independent notions certainly. >> herod the great was probably one of the greatest kings of the post-biblical period in israel, but you wouldn't want your daughter to date him. he was ambitious, brutal, extremely successful. >> and it is one of the real untold ironies of jewish history that this man, who... who's the guy you love to hate in jewish history, really, leaves the most indelible mark on the face of the land of israel. >> it appears that herod thought of jerusalem as his showpiece. he really wanted to make it a place where people would come, just as people would have gone to athens, or rome, or the great cities of the mediterranean world. >> narrator: a meticulously accurate mo
people of negative spirits from the previous year. >> all right. >> good one. >> spain, natalie, you know about this one. we're going to show it. >> we're going to demo. it sounds easy to eat 12 grapes. it is not easy. >> do we have the chimes? >> we're going to do it. so 30 seconds on the clock, please. >> this should go well. >> are we going to hear this? [ chiming ] >> you can't even get them in your mouth. oh, my -- good work. >> thank you. this is what happens when you've been pounding campaign all night. you can't deliver a grape into your mouth at close range. >> i'm dead sober. how do they do this drunk? >> you littered the floor with grapes. >> i'm sorry. >> they did those chimes too fast. >> those were very fast. >> that was very fun. >> you missed your mouth by half an inch. you couldn't make the transaction. amazing. >> how was your grape eating? >> you have to make one. yes! it's in there. >> i started laughing looking at everybody. >> it's fun. >> this is my new tradition. new underwear and grape eating. >> not for kids. >> exactly. >> now i have a little game for you guys.
in spain, italy, and great britain. ashley: corporate earnings, signs of weakness in the last earnings season. concernedded about that? >> i think that it's cyclical. i think there's been little signs. i think we have to get employment together in the united states. housing is starting to come back. we're -- slowly, but in the north east in particular, there's more demand, and there's less housing inventory, but in the rest of the country, we have to wait and see on that. employment is really, really the key thing, and so what comes out of all the negotiations and how we employee people, infrastructure, and all of that makes a difference. ashley: companies hunkering down, a lot of cash, but not doing in until washington gets the act together. >> means technology, for example, could be a big sector. if companies get signals from washington and go out and invest into hiring people, putting technology online, it could be great, but we're just waiting and waiting and waiting, which is why it's a cliff hanger. ashley: cliff hanger, i'm tired of saying "fiscal cliff. i'll use "cliff hanger."
that was in terrible shape to begin with and i think you have a lot of austerity fatigue going on spain, italy, portugal, certainly greece. so you have those economic woes. the euro is not going to thrive and it may survive thanks to the ecb, but you're not going to get that economy to thrive, and the fiscal union ask those are very slow going and though they may be moving quickly by european standards and i've been given the magnitude of the problem going very slowly. >> how should people be thinking about this? the average american, and they've been hearing about it for so long and they're not sure it will affect their pocketbook. do you think they will? >> and there's this incredible chance that greece will leave and the dominos will begin to fall. i think that's unluikely to happen as long as the ecb is willing to support that currency, but will it thrive? will those economies boom? i don't think so, i think it will be another year of recession and you will find individual opportunities and the stock picker's market and far as it's a strong growth, they're not there yet. >> thanks so much
maybe, the worst is finally past, there's some hideous headline out of greece or portugal or spain or italy that the comes back with a vengeance and the s&p gets bashed down by a torrent of selling. that's why it's so important to prepare yourself and your stocks for the next catastrophe around the corner. expected or unexpected, so that you can make money in any market, or at least lose less and not just when things are going smoothly. you have to build this stuff into what i call your world view. you have to assume that somewhere, sometime, something will go wrong. i'm not saying you should be a super skeptic perma-bear, not at all. over the course of my 31-plus years in this business i've seen the averages climb way too way, watched the market make people way too much money to ever be that cynical and close-minded. being negative all the time has not historically been a lucrative strategy, and i don't see any reason why that should change now. there are a handful of incredibly smart, professional short sellers, hats off, able to turn pessimism into profits but i don't recommend
and see what's happening in countries like greece and italy and spain and ireland have these massive debt. now we cannot repay them, massive interest-rate increases, you and i have talked about this before. but shame on us for not realizing that we stay on this path, we are in real financial trouble. gregg: stephen moore, economics writer for "the wall street journal." on her way to the fiscal cliff. thank you very much. heather: russian president vladimir putin accused of playing politics with the lives of orphans. signing a bill banning americans from adopting russian children. bad news has left dozens of american families heartbroken. amy kellogg is live in london with details. reporter: heather, one russian activist says that every member of the russian parliament voted for this measure should be obliged to adopt a russian child of his or her own. there are 700,000 russian children who need a home. only 18,000 russian families who signed up to adopt. this new law was named after a russian baby that died in the custody of his american adoptive parents. he was neglected. but it is reall
to spain and the ski slopes in the western united states. she's been at one point during the period of several months, 42 days on vacation. she is living the life of a very pampered woman and apparently this fits with her personality. >> you right, where's the clintons were open and above horrid about their co-presidency posting that hillary was an equal partner with bill, the obamas have been careful to hide the fact that michelle is the president's most important political adviser and the one he listens to above all others before he makes decisions. >> yes and i think that's so true. the way she does that is often through her very best friend, how she gets her opinions through. her very best friend, valerie jarrett. valerie jarrett is a woman who hired michelle many many years ago to work with her in mayor daley's administration in chicago. the more importantly valerie jarrett is the person who comes from a very well off african-american family with great connections to power sources all over chicago. when she introduced barack and michelle obama to the power center, african-amer
of champagnes and other sparkling wines, this is from spain. sparkling wines, different places in the u.s. and in the country around the country, i have different sparkling wines. i have chandon, proseco from italy. >> juliet: with a little straw there. >> fun minis. >> juliet: for people who have no desire to make their own drinks. thank you very much. we'll get all this information out on our web site. >> cocktailguru.com. >> juliet: thank you so much. we're going to take a quick break. we'll be back in two minutes. stay with us [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. everyone tells a little white lie now and then. but now she wants my recipe [ clears his throat ] [ softly ] she's right behind me isn't she? [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. . . with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purche, everday! woo-hoo!!
-- in many senses you could call it profit taking -- not in the case of spain where you see a major underperformance. >> let me say the german finance minister suggested he thought the worst of the eurozone crisis is now past. he said the government in athens knows it cannot financially over burden the rest of the eurozone countries and is acting as it should. he was optimistic on france as well despite the fact the data is indicating we'll still get a contraction in the third quarter, for most of the eurozone. germany's economic position is arguably deteriorating but still schauble there is relatively optimistic that the crisis is over. in the meantime what is also happening is this money is beginning to flow into, from the public safety net to support the banks so you have the recapitalization of the banks but that isn't of course good news for everybody in the case of the ipo from last year you have 53,000 small shareholders there effectively having their positions in the debt smashed against the whole. they've been selling out again today to try and retrieve what they can becaus
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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